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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 06/09/2004 :  11:19:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
i got this off the net after searchin using

chicago grafitti. this is what i got


I was 16 years old the first time I ran from the cops. Feet
thumping on the hard ground and metal mixing balls clanging in
spray pain cans inside our backpacks, we ran out from under a
Dallas overpass and through neighborhood front lawns. When the
flashing red, white and blue lights disappeared into the black roads
I collapsed to my back on the damp grass, laughing and wheezing
in the cool summer night air. I lifted my head slightly off the
ground and watched my buddies. Hunched over, hands on his
knees, Charlie coughed until he hacked up thick, bright rainbow
spit. Months later he'd be charged with a felony for the same crime.

What appears as mindless vandalism to the average passer-by
and as criminal offenses to government officials are the
determined footholds of an unrecognized subculture. Graffiti
artists, who call themselves "writers", are restless with society.
They have built a world based on creativity of expression and
communication through art.

The politics of graffiti are complicated. The government says
graffiti defaces public and private property, drives away business,
and is indicative of gangs and crime. The last 30 years have been
laden with more laws and harsher punishements for the
non-violent criminals persectuted for painting a wall. Graffiti
writers live like outlaws.

A few Sundays ago, my phone rang at midnight.
"hades o?"
"Hi," answered a quiet, suspicious voice.
A pause. Then the voice curtly introduced himself as Sivel, a
prominent graffiti writer I had contacted by email a few days
earlier. He waited for an explanation. I gave him all my
credentials, assuring him that I would treat the subject with an
open mind. After a half hour of convincing, he finally relaxed
and laughed.
"Well I had expected you to pick up the phone and say, 'FBI.
Agent so-and-so speaking.'"

Sivel has every reason to be cautious. Chicago's Mayor
Richard Daley has waged a "war on graffiti" and created the
Graffiti Blasters with a 24-hour hotline to remove graffiti on
public and private properties with a few hours notice. Chicago
spends four million annually on graffiti removal. Four million
dollars
, which Sivel's friend Nerd tells me he'd like to see spent
on art education in low-income schools.



Matt Smith, a fast-talking, white-collar representative from
Chicago's deputy commissioner's offive had little time to speak
with me. He said, "Graffiti is definently something we're
strongly opposed to. The city belongs to the people of the city
of Chicago, not to the people who just want to put their stamp
up on the walls of the city."

Sivel grew up in Chicago. he attended Chicago schools and
worked in Chicago businesses. A late 20-something decked
out in his baby-blue hip-hop finest, Sivel looks at me with a
goofy smile. "There was a time when Mayor Harold
Washington gave permision walls to writers to make their
mark because he understood that graffiti writers were also
citizens. Criminal damage to property is when you break
something that used to work. When you paint on a wall,
you're not damaging that wall. The Daley regime thinks
otherwise." Sivel and his older brother, Page One, are both
self-proclaimed "victims of the brown paint" that has been
used to cover up their artwork.

Graffiti is part political, announcing a strong hold on freedom of
speech and a furious rejection of the association of colors and
words with violence and crime. An intelligent man with a sarcastic
sense of humor, Chris Silva is an old veteran of the graffiti scene.
"Graffiti is a symbol of unrest and a desire for a voice in a system in
which you won't be heard unless you're on the side of money or
power. Even if your intent isn't political, the act is," he says.



Graffiti writers use the term "bombing" to describe numerous
"tags" written very quickly in one location. Some walls are
bombed in an Andy Warhol style of neat rows of repeating images.
others, Take 2 says, look like a bomb went off and splattered
paint everywhere.
"Bombing is like an all out assault, just like an arming attacking
another country," Sivel says. But while the name suggest
aggressive, destructive tendencies, Chris Silva says, "I prefer the
bombs fired by urban artists to any other kind. The creators of
those bombs are often very peaceful, warm-hearted, interesting
and dynamic individuals."



Graffiti writers are all sure of two things: graffiti has always
existed, and graffiti will never die. It's hard to pinpoint when and
how graffiti started. Besides heiroglyphics on the side of cave
walls, graffiti began appearing during Word War II in the form of
mustaches drawn on advertisements and "Kilroy was here"
scrawled on numerous places. Graffiti in its present form began
as gang graffiti in the 1960s to mark territory, but later evolved
into elaborate murals and in-your-face tags. As graffiti developed,
so did the organization of the writers.


In Chicago in the 1980s, crews of writers united at all-city graffiti
meetings with a goal of expanding graffiti in the city. Take 2 says
that when one train was painted, it would simply be taken out of
service. But if "The Federation" as they called themselves, could
paint all the trains, they would be forced to run and writers would
be able to spread their art. The Federation brought hundereds of
writers of all races together, but fell apart because anti-graffiti
squads formed in response.



But, graffiti didn't die. Somehow writers clung to it, and built a
complex relationship with their art. Most writers will tell you they
write graffiti because they feel like they are on the outskirts of
society, because they enjoy creativity and expression, because
there's a sense of friendly competition with other writers, and
because there's an adrenaline rush.



"You'd go and pick a night when it was dark with no moon out,"
says Take 2 as his eyes begin to dance. "You'd dressall in black
and carry a bag of paint and your sketchbook. It was the thrill of
getting caught and adrenaline pumping. The sweet smell of paint
would fill your lungs, and your energy would build as you shook
the can as quietly as you could. The most exhilirating part was
when you sprayed that first mark. When you were done, it was
still dark and you still hadn't seen your piece. So you'd sneak out,
hide and wait for light. Then you'd seen it for the first time, and
there was just no way you could go home and sleep that night or
the next night. I've never done drugs before, but that's what I
think it would feel like. You can't stop thinking about it. It
becomes a part of your life that is inseparable from all other parts.

Writers all mention an element of addiction when speaking about
graffiti. Cope says in his documentary that graffiti is like a dope
addiction. Take 2, Sivel, Page One, and Nerd all fervently agree.
Chris Silva told me he was attached to graffiti, but had a love/hate
relationship with it. I asked Sivel to tell me what hate could
possibly exist within the subculture they were so attached to.

Leaning over the edge of his bar stool, he says, "It takes time,
sweat and tears. you try so hard to be perfect and it doesn't
come out the way you want it to. It's like your girlfriend. You're
married to graffiti, and sometimes the relationship goes sour and
sometimes it's sweet. But it's always a roller coaster ride."

So what begins as a socio-political idea and a refute of the binds
of societ becomes an increasingly personal experience as a
writer injects graffiti into his veins. Graffiti warrants complex
explanations. Writers try to understand their relationship with
the art just as much as, or even more so than, casual viewers
and government officials who can't understand why, despite
tougher laws, public propert and business walls keep getting
spray-painted.

At the end of our lunch, after I'd put away my tape recorder and
notebook, Take 2 says he wants to ask me a question. Have any
of the graffiti writers I've tried to contact refused an interview?
I thought for a moment. No, actually graffiti writers have been the
most responsive group of people I've ever tried to get in contact
with. He nods in expectation and looks contemplative for a
moment. Then he brought a point no other graffiti writer, book
or documentary mentioned.

"I said we were unsatisfied with society. But I think there must
be some deeper psychological reason why we as graffiti writers
need the attention of having our names seen everywhere. But I
haven't figured out what that is."

I thought to myself, I'm just a different kind of writer. There is
some strange need for attention in all of use. We want some part
of use to be seen, read, talked about or communicated to a larger
audience. Graffiti appeals to the youth because of its rebellious
nature. It becomes an addiction, a lover or a lifestyle because it
taps into and symbolizes something personal within each writer.
Graffiti is a highly misunderstood subculture. But Chris Silva
says it's just a microcosm of a larger society that is filled with
individuals struggling to be heard











Take 2 studies a wall and rattles the green spray paint can in his
grimy hands before applying a careful line. Crowds of people
gather to watch him paint, clutching their coats in the 30-mile an
hour wind. He's doing a legal permission wall now, but he
recalls his younger days of illegal escapades. A well-known
graffiti writer for over 20 years, Take 2 said his graffiti crew
noticed back of business walls that were dreary and gray and
covered them with cartoons, characters and colors. He has been
arrested four times for graffiti, convicted once. I told Take 2
about my friends who were arrested in Dallas on felony charges
of gang-related conspiracy to commit organized crime after
painting the back of a local grocery store.



"For gangs the sole purpose of graffiti is to intimidate," he
says. "As graffiti writers we are here to express ourselves and
gain fame outside the neighborhood. All of the members of our
group were pressured by gangs to join, but graffiti kept us
away from gangs. People join gangs for a family, we found
our family here. Graffiti allowed us the ability to travel and
meet people of other ethnic backgrounds."


The families of graffiti writers formed "crews," and
altogether bonded as a larger subculture of average people who
came together after hours to paint walls and trains.
Take 2 reminds me of a superhero. White-collar
professional by day, fierce graffiti writer by night. This
clean-cut, college-educated computer programmer who carries
a black leather portfolio suggested meeting me at a downtown
cosmpolitan eatery on his lunch break. As he spoke, I treid to
imagine this well-dressed 30-something as the culprit behind
countless illegal pieces covering the city of Chicago. Why
would he do it?



"You ask me how you can go and paint on someone's
property? Only if you don't feel like you're a part of society.
Society didn't have a lot to offer us, so we felt it was okay to
take a wall for our own space. I am a tax-paying citizen, and
I paid train fares, and so part of the train belonged to me and I
wanted to paint that part."


Part of the rejection of society involves the nicknames graffiti
writers use. "You take a name that's not yours, that wasn't
given and forced upon you by someone else, and paint it on a
wall," Take 2 says. The artistic twist that writers give to their
nickname is another part of rejecting society. "When you're
taught to make letters as a kid, you're first given a box and told
to make your letters fit inside the box. Then you're judged by
how much you go outside the box. Then as your grow older
you learn cursive, and you're taught to angle your letters to the
right. In graffiti, we angle our letters to the left. It's
immediately recognized as something that's not normal."



While writers reject the system and rules of societym they
cling to a few golden rules themselves. Don't write over
someone else's graffiti unless you're a better artist. Don't leave
your graffiti partners behind. And above all, when painting
trains, do not step on the third rail. It will kill you.



In a documentary by the famed New York City graffiti artist,
Cope, he grabs his gut and announces the difficulty for a tubby
man like himself to climb rooftops and run from cops. Then he
bounces along train tracks, shaking a paint can and looking
over his shoulder. One wrong step and he'd be electrocuted.
Take 2 shrugs. "People have died painting trains, but we're
willing to risk our lives for the art."





Edited by - FLASH ABC on 06/09/2004 11:22:05 AM

Face TAW
Gold Dot

92 Posts

Posted - 06/09/2004 :  3:42:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thats a dope read ... spell sout alotta things i havent been able to put into words... (must be that damn dislexia)

good lookin
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komedy
Pink Dot

USA
1076 Posts

Posted - 06/09/2004 :  7:38:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WHAT UP FACIAL^^^^^-----------DAMN I CANT BELEAVE I JUST READ THE WHOLE ISH.....WOW TALK ABOUT SOME REAL STEEZ---BIG NAMES-BIG FACTS--
I LOVE GRAPH CAUSE OF THOSE PEOPLE ESPECIALLY SIVEL.....








Every Destiny Seeks Knowledge
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mista45
Grey Outline

USA
313 Posts

Posted - 06/10/2004 :  12:01:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The media shows us love but the dictator of this city dosen't?WTF

shaek45
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AERO
Moderator

Saint Kitts and Nevis
3841 Posts

Posted - 06/10/2004 :  12:10:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
YO FLASH THIS THAT ARTICLE THAT TAKE2 POSTED A FEW MONTHS BACK....


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CHUMBLY0001
Pink Dot

5970 Posts

Posted - 06/12/2004 :  04:11:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
FIRST TIME I SAW IT. EITHER THAT OR THERE'S TO MANY ARTICLE BEING WRITTEN, WHICH IS GOOD. MAKES FOR GOOD READING, AND MAYBE AN UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT WRITERS R ALL ABOUT.
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BladeBrown
Gold Dot

38 Posts

Posted - 06/12/2004 :  11:07:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
i love how everyone knows all these writers from LA, NYC, whatever and they do these articles on writers there about how crazy they are and how much they paint..but what about the god SIVEL? regardless of what anybody says that cat had chitown on lock in the early-mid 90s and probably the main reason i ever got interested in grafitti.
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SEEN-ABC
Pink Dot

USA
3900 Posts

Posted - 06/14/2004 :  4:07:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit SEEN-ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
HEY FLASH
THAT WAS NICE WORDS ABOUT THE GRAF IN THE MEDIA..............

SEEN-ABC

"IT TAKES COURAGE & IMAGINATION TO SET NEW DESIGN TRENDS-TO CREATE THE TRENDS ONESELF RATHER THAN FOLLOWING THE FLOW!"
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CHUMBLY0001
Pink Dot

5970 Posts

Posted - 06/15/2004 :  03:10:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WELL DRINK A LITTLE LESS NEXT TIME FLASH.
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 06/15/2004 :  11:18:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SEEN-ABC

HEY FLASH
THAT WAS NICE WORDS ABOUT THE GRAF IN THE MEDIA..............

SEEN-ABC



yeah can you beleive they put something nice

http://projectlogan.tumblr.com/
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 06/15/2004 :  11:21:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BladeBrown

i love how everyone knows all these writers from LA, NYC, whatever and they do these articles on writers there about how crazy they are and how much they paint..but what about the god SIVEL? regardless of what anybody says that cat had chitown on lock in the early-mid 90s and probably the main reason i ever got interested in grafitti.



I DONT KNOW ONE WRITER FROM LA, AND NYC AND PROUD OF IT. SIVEL WAS THE MAN IN THE 90'S.

http://projectlogan.tumblr.com/

Edited by - FLASH ABC on 06/15/2004 11:24:59 AM
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kid crash
Pink Dot

3599 Posts

Posted - 06/18/2004 :  4:13:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
...i on the other hand ...met many l.a. writers...and piecers............but....have yet....to go nyc........if i go to nyc....i want to meet more breakers...than writers.........just being honest//////

kid crash
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kid crash
Pink Dot

3599 Posts

Posted - 06/18/2004 :  5:45:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
....on august 13.......a great movie....comes out.........alien vs. predator/////

kid crash
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SiCk-WiT-iT-MaMi
Gold Dot

18 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2006 :  07:25:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
DATS G0OD SHiiT Y0.. GRAFFiiN' iiS LiiF3!!
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kid crash
Pink Dot

3599 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2006 :  11:38:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
flash---transformers???????? no way//

..get ff4 part 2

jessica alba is too hot

...jessica in blue....what else do ya need

fantastic 4 part 2---and hostel part 2...will be great////////

kid crash
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2007 :  3:51:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Graffiti Could Cost Offender's Parents $3,000
City Council Considers Cracking Down


CHICAGO -- Bracing for a summer graffiti blitz, Mayor Richard M. Daley will move on Wednesday to hit juvenile graffiti vandals where they live -- with their parents.

No longer would parents be held financially accountable only if there's a guilty verdict at a criminal trial, something that rarely happens because prosecutors normally settle for community service.

No more would parents and guardians simply be notified by mail within three days of an act of vandalism.


Instead, parents and taggers would be summoned together to a joint administrative hearing where the parents could be hit with fines as high as $750, or $3,000 worth of restitution, whichever is higher, according to Daley’s plan being introduced at Wednesday’s City Council meeting.



Copyright 2007, Sun-Times News Grou

http://projectlogan.tumblr.com/
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REJECT
Banana Skinny

USA
173 Posts

Posted - 05/23/2007 :  3:53:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FLASHABC

Graffiti Could Cost Offender's Parents $3,000
City Council Considers Cracking Down


CHICAGO -- Bracing for a summer graffiti blitz, Mayor Richard M. Daley will move on Wednesday to hit juvenile graffiti vandals where they live -- with their parents.

No longer would parents be held financially accountable only if there's a guilty verdict at a criminal trial, something that rarely happens because prosecutors normally settle for community service.

No more would parents and guardians simply be notified by mail within three days of an act of vandalism.


Instead, parents and taggers would be summoned together to a joint administrative hearing where the parents could be hit with fines as high as $750, or $3,000 worth of restitution, whichever is higher, according to Daley’s plan being introduced at Wednesday’s City Council meeting.



Copyright 2007, Sun-Times News Grou



f**k the mayor, he seriously doesnt have anything better to do..? Whats he doing about the gangbanging? Yea, what a good idea, lets focus all of our attension on graff instead of the sh*t thats killing people 24/7... dum asses...
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 06/13/2007 :  1:01:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Parents of graffiti vandals must pay a price for the damage done by their children to curb an epidemic that is costing Chicago taxpayers a fortune, Mayor Daley said Tuesday.
Daley said he's open to a compromise that includes a somewhat lower fine to appease aldermen who felt he went too far by hitting parents with fines as high as $750 or $3,000 worth of restitution, whichever is greater.

But the mayor said he would insist on a fine sizeable enough to get the attention of parents who seem to look the other way while their unruly teenagers are out spray-painting the city or destroying windows with acid-etching.

"People have to be responsible for their children," the mayor said. "Why should your son go and break someone's windows and you say, 'I can't do anything about it,' every week, every month. It's costing taxpayers more and more money. Don't you think if we prevent them from doing it the second, third, fourth or the 50th time, we've accomplished something?"

Chicago expects 170,000 incidents of graffiti vandalism in 2007, up from 106,849 cases three years ago. The number of juvenile arrests has nearly doubled over the last year -- from 122 through May 31 last year to 228 arrests during the same period this year.

"I really believe adults should be responsible," Daley said. "I'm sorry. I believe that. You can't just walk away and say, 'My 14-year-old son or 16-year-old son can do this. I can't do anything with them.' Well, just tell them not to do it. How's that?"

Currently, parents are held financially accountable only if there's a guilty verdict at a criminal trial

http://projectlogan.tumblr.com/
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hypno_one
Pink Dot

USA
1334 Posts

Posted - 06/14/2007 :  12:26:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
daley is a HIS BIG PEE PEE....it would be dope if a whole bunch of n***as go up to a public hearing...graff will not die!!

2009...new world order..
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NoMOnE
Grey Outline

Ireland
403 Posts

Posted - 06/14/2007 :  01:31:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
f**k DALEY

nom
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eternal_urge
Orange Dot

Israel
605 Posts

Posted - 06/14/2007 :  09:06:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit eternal_urge's Homepage  Reply with Quote
lets soulja up to that byaaaaatchwearing our marc ecko getting up clothes haha... but thats a good idea.. go in there wearing our reg gear... people that wear suits, punk rockers, baggy clothes... whatever your style wear it, and we go up there as a group to show that its not just kids, there are grown men that do this.. its not about vandalism, its expression and they still dont get it

si mon ese....pinche paisa
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