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DaMeT-3XD
Grey Outline

412 Posts

Posted - 06/21/2007 :  10:20:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Article in todays Sun-Times......

Chicago will go a little easier on graffiti vandals' parents
CITY COUNCIL | Their fine would be $250 instead of $750

June 21, 2007
BY FRAN SPIELMAN City Hall Reporter/fspielman@suntimes.com
Mayor Daley's stalled plan to put the financial squeeze on parents of young graffiti vandals will be advanced by a City Council committee today, but only after the maximum fine is reduced by two-thirds -- from $750 to $250 -- an influential alderman said Wednesday.
Police Committee Chairman Isaac Carothers (29th) said he also plans to give administrative hearing officers the option to waive the $250 fine entirely and sentence parents instead to community service. The length of that service will not be specified, he said.

"You need to give the hearing officer some wiggle room, some discretion as opposed to sticking everybody" with a $750 fine or $3,000 restitution, whichever is greater, Carothers said.

"That's too rigid for indigent people. All it's going to do is create an uncollectible bill for the city. For a first-time offender, $250 is reasonable and plenty high enough to force parents to take notice. I don't think a parent is going to consider that light."

Ald. Ed Smith (28th) argued that even a $250 fine is too high.

"There's no way in the world that a parent can tell what a kid is doing --even between the school and the house. The kid could spray-paint a garage or a house and the parent might not know anything about it," Smith said.

Chicago expects to be hit with 170,000 incidents of graffiti vandalism in 2007 -- including acid etching of windows -- up from 106,849 cases three years ago.

The number of juvenile arrests has nearly doubled over the last year -- from 122 through May 31, 2006, to 228 arrests during the same period this year.

Last week, the Police Committee ignored that alarming trend and put the brakes on a mayoral crackdown timed to coincide with the traditional summer graffiti blitz.

Daley responded with trademark sarcasm. He offered to reduce the fine to $5 and raise it to $500 after "the second or third or the fourth or 50th" offense.

Daley said he proposed the fines because "everyone is sick and tired of cleaning it off when it's the same people" causing all the damage.

Currently, parents are held financially accountable only if there's a guilty verdict at a criminal trial. That's something that rarely happens. Prosecutors routinely settle for community service that often lasts only a few weeks.

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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 07/18/2007 :  2:14:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Until the vandal squad took him away in handcuffs, it seemed that KET had grown up.
KET is the graffiti signature of Alain Maridueña, who as a teenager in the 1980s made a name spray painting subway trains. But he'd since evolved into an old-school legend — historian, publisher, lecturer, consultant — who supposedly hadn't tagged a train since his first child was born.

Then, in October, police raided his apartment and seized computers, cameras and 3,000 cans of spray paint. Now Maridueña is accused of what he said he'd left behind: putting his tag up on subway cars.

Lacking eyewitnesses, prosecutors offer a novel case. They say Maridueña is incriminated by the presence of his distinctive KET tag on subway cars and by the fact that photographs of those KET tags were downloaded onto his computer shortly after the trains were painted.


PHOTOS: New Yorker defends his urban craft

The case is part of a new war on American graffiti, that long-controversial hybrid of art and vandalism. But fans and critics agree on this much: Never has so much been done to fight graffiti, and never has there been so much of it.

The Chicago mayor's office says it expects about 170,000 cases of graffiti this year, up from 106,849 three years ago. Graffiti is one of the most frequently reported complaints to Minneapolis' 311 information line. In Los Angeles, a kid tagged a bus carrying Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

Graffiti has become so common in Washington, D.C., that Mayor Adrian Fenty has claimed the right to remove it from private property without owners' approval. Chicago Mayor Richard Daley wants to fine parents for their children's scribbles. In Peoria, Ariz., surveillance cameras have been placed on poles in high-graffiti areas.

Many communities have passed local ordinances limiting minors' access to spray paint and wide-tipped markers, or adopted a Justice Department recommendation to set up walls or boards for legal graffiti art.

There are no national statistics on graffiti — much of it isn't even reported to police — and only theories about why it's increasing.

"It's an amalgam of things coming together," says Tim Cephart, a graffiti vandalism consultant. He cites graffiti's ever-larger role in pop culture, including its prominence in rap music videos.

Hugo Martinez, a graffiti historian and author ofGraffiti NYC, has a different take: "There's more graffbecausethere's more police enforcement. Repression leads to aggression."

In New York, the KET case shows how badly authorities want to wipe out graffiti — and how difficult it is to do so.

Maridueña, who faces 14 felony counts that could send him to prison for years, says he's innocent.

"In my heyday, it would have made sense," he says of the charges. "But there's a battle going on now, and I'm caught in the middle. I represent a New York that the city government doesn't want to exist anymore. They want a pristine city, like Disneyland."

Subway as canvas

Graffiti — any unauthorized, personalized markings on a public or private surface — goes back to ancient times. "Some kind of marking of walls has existed in cities forever," says Charlotta Kotik, a curator who organized a graffiti art exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum last year. "It always has existed, and it always will."

In the 1970s a new form appeared in New York City. Kids used aerosol paint to adorn subway cars with highly stylized tags (Julio 204, Taki 183) that featured intertwined, brightly colored bubble or block letters. The subway carried the new look across the city.

Some people (Norman Mailer) liked it; others (Mayor Edward Koch) hated it. Whatever its artistic merits, graffiti came to symbolize New York's fall into physical, fiscal and civic disorder.


I SUGGEST YOU ALL HIT THE COMMENT SECTION OF USA TODAY TODAY!!!!

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FLASH ABC
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USA
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Posted - 07/20/2007 :  09:23:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Graffiti vandals may have to wait for driver's license
CITY COUNCIL | Burke proposes making offenders eligible at age 18

BY FRAN SPIELMAN City Hall Reporter fspielman@suntimes.com


Juveniles convicted of graffiti-related crimes would have to wait two years -- until their 18th birthday -- to get driver's licenses, under a crackdown proposed Thursday by the City Council's most powerful alderman.
Finance Committee Chairman Edward M. Burke (14th) knows that there's no punishment more severe for a teenager than taking away the freedom that comes from being able to drive.

That's why he wants to snatch it away from convicted juvenile graffiti vandals. It's the best way to get their attention, the alderman said.

Currently, Illinois teenagers can qualify for a learner's permit at 15½ that allows them to drive with an adult during daytime hours. When they turn 16, they can get a full-fledged license provided they have spent three months driving with a permit.

The General Assembly has approved a bill now awaiting the governor's signature that would extend the mandatory permit period from three months to nine months.

Burke's resolution, introduced at Thursday's City Council meeting, urges lawmakers to make convicted graffiti vandals wait until age 18 to get a license. And Burke wants convicted taggers who already have licenses to have them suspended for six months.

"Teens are keenly aware of the many advantages -- social and otherwise -- of possessing the privilege to drive," Burke said in a press release. "If the Illinois General Assembly adopts this proposal, it would make many potential scofflaws think twice before they vandalize public or private property."

Graffiti is a chronic problem that's costing Chicago taxpayers $6 million in annual clean-up costs.

The city expects to be hit with 170,000 incidents of graffiti vandalism in 2007 -- including acid etching of windows -- up from 106,849 cases three years ago. The number of juvenile arrests has nearly doubled over the last year.

Burke said the driver's license penalty would be a perfect complement to Mayor Daley's newly approved plan to hold the parents of taggers financially responsible for the destructive acts of their children.

Also Thursday, Burke proposed installing dashboard-mounted cameras on city ambulances, fire trucks and police cars to gather "irrefutable" photographic evidence against those who fail to yield for emergency vehicles.

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tselone
Moderator

Netherlands
4271 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2007 :  10:17:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit tselone's Homepage  Reply with Quote
flash...i read that bogus article on graffiti and license's...bullsh*t...thats all it is...everyone knows the regular age for a graffiti writer is 35...jajajaja...

mi phone is out...but i will call you soon about 2nyt...laters...

tsel

tselone

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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2007 :  10:46:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tselone

flash...i read that bogus article on graffiti and license's...bullsh*t...thats all it is...everyone knows the regular age for a graffiti writer is 35...jajajaja...

mi phone is out...but i will call you soon about 2nyt...laters...

tsel




GRAB THE RED EYE TODAY

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SikOneRoks_Chicago
Gold Dot

Mexico
40 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2007 :  11:13:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
City Vs. Graffiti
i was all happy walkin bak to da crib den i see da graff blasters down da blok imma hit it up tonight hopefully make dem feel salty ass hades hehe F**K DA BUFF!!!

gewd lookin out bro

BtC (2) 22o3
(B)lazin (T)hat (C)ronik
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NoMOnE
Grey Outline

Ireland
403 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2007 :  2:59:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
why not break into the yard... and blast the blasters... jajaja... then go write our names on things

nom
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Wiley
Grey Outline

293 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2007 :  6:13:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quiet

Living a lie.
Btl Crew.
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2007 :  3:25:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Police hunting vandals who defaced memorial
August 1, 2007
STNG News Service
Chicago police continue to hunt for vandals who tagged a police memorial with graffiti about a week ago.

A "generic tagging name" was found on a wall at Gold Star Families Memorial and Park at Waldron and Museum Campus on July 23, police said.

The park honors officers killed in the line of duty.

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W1DGET_THE_M1DGET
Pink Dot

Philippines
1122 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2007 :  6:54:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
they get one tombstone...

why do they need another one?

with all the bullsh*t within the cpd i can prolly count on one hand
the few honorable and respectable to actually have their names remembered...one hand...that ain't much.

"generic tagging name"...i didn't realize some of us were name brand.

The Coolest Guy west of the lake...and you can take that to the bank.
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NoMOnE
Grey Outline

Ireland
403 Posts

Posted - 08/02/2007 :  01:25:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
lol
maybe he wrote generic
or tagr haha

nom
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 10/02/2007 :  2:28:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
CHICAGO — One minute, a red scribble of graffiti was on the cinderblock wall. The next minute, it was gone — erased by a jet-blast mixture of water and baking soda.

Nearby, a cryptic gang message had been scrawled in paint on a plastic trash can cover. Within moments, it disappeared, too — scrubbed by a citrus-based solution.
“It’s no different than a dog marking a fire hydrant — it’s somebody marking their turf,” Matt Smith, spokesman for Chicago’s Streets and Sanitation Department, said recently as city workers cleaned up defaced surfaces in a Northwest Side neighborhood. “It’s vandalism. It’s ego.”

Chicago is trying to take back its walls through a $6.5 million annual program known as “Graffiti Blasters” that began in 1993. But at times, it might seem like an uphill battle for the 77 employees who use an arsenal of solvents and paints to erase or obscure the work of vandals.

Each year, mobile crews remove an average of 130,000 pieces of graffiti at public and private properties. The phoned-in reports come in constantly, and given the volume, it may take as long as a week to respond to a call, said supervisor Tom O’Connor. There is no charge to property owners.

The graffiti in Chicago ranges from intimidating gang messages to the random “taggings” of juvenile attention-seekers. There are even elaborate, quasi-artistic — though illegal — wall paintings and stenciled pieces of “guerilla marketing.”

“Graffiti is not an expression,” Smith said. “If you want to make an expression, use a canvas.”

And then there are the pieces of “hate graffiti” that express a racist or vulgar message. Those markings get top priority for removal, Smith said.

Graffiti Blasters is the reactive side of Chicago’s efforts. The city is ready to launch a revised front-end strategy, with the recent approval of an ordinance that holds parents or guardians financially liable if their minor child damages a property with graffiti. Under the new law, which will take effect in November, adults can be socked with a fine of between $250 and $750 and be obligated to pay restitution.

Mayor Richard Daley sought higher financial penalties but negotiated a cap with aldermen who said poor families would be hurt by heftier payments. Ald. James Balcer, a Vietnam veteran who was incensed by vandalism at a war memorial downtown, said the new ordinance is appropriate.

Chicago has tried to fight graffiti legislatively in the past, and officials concede the problem hasn’t gone away. The city council banned the sale of spray paint at local stores and more recently prohibited the sale of acid-based pastes that vandals have used to permanently scratch windows — a more recent trend in graffiti.

A sponsor of the latter measure, Ald. Manny Flores, said troublemakers can get around the law by ordering the product over the Internet. Normally, the pastes are used for arts and crafts. When used on windows, the damage cannot be reversed; Graffiti Blasters refers acid-etchings to the police department, Smith said.

“I feel terrible for these entrepreneurs, these mom-and-pop (store owners) trying to make a go of it,” Flores said. “They go to work, and all of a sudden they see their front window damaged.”

One graffiti expert-for-hire said cities that document and track the activity of vandals have had the most success in reducing it. Timothy Kephart, president and CEO of Graffiti Tracker Inc., said his Omaha, Neb.-based firm has contracts with 24 cities to analyze data and provide “intelligence” to police officials, who use the information to zero in on suspects.

“If you don’t catch the kids, you can’t hold the parent accountable,” he said.

Kephart said the vandalism has “significantly increased” over the past five years in urban and suburban areas alike. It is thought that graffiti costs property owners billions of dollars annually across the United States.

“It’s multiple factors,” Kephart said. “You have got more of a pop culture that is exposing kids to this to make it seem kind of cool. There’s probably more disorganization in the home.”

Smith, the streets and sanitation agency spokesman, said Chicago’s Graffiti Blasters program represents a zero-tolerance policy as prolific vandals keep trying to send their “message.”

“We’ll send a message: We won’t tolerate it,” he said.


Mike Ramsey can be reached at (312) 857-2323 or ghns-ramsey@sbcglobal.net.





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Who is behind the graffiti?
The majority of graffiti in cities, some 80 percent, is “tagging” done by youths ages 12 to 18 who seek notoriety, says Tim Kephart, president and CEO of the private firm Graffiti Tracker Inc., which analyzes vandalism patterns for cities.

He said the other 20 percent is gang graffiti that is meant to inspire fear and intimidation. He said those markings are typically left by the gang’s youngest members.

Only about 1 percent of graffiti comprise the elaborate and colorful murals known as “bombing,” Kephart said. These artists are in their late teens or 20s, he said.

“They do have talent, but the problem is, in order to get that good, they did a lot of damage,” Kephart said.

Paint by numbers

The number of reported graffiti incidents in Chicago has fluctuated little since 2000.


2007: 102,630 (through Sept. 1)

2006: 162,635

2005: 123,440

2004: 106,849

2003: 141,012

2002: 164,335

2001: 161,693

2000: 127,703
— Source: Chicago Department of Streets and Sanitation




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itag
Banana Skinny

247 Posts

Posted - 10/02/2007 :  4:08:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
stupid daley
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2007 :  1:03:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
BY MIKE RAMSEY

GateHouse News Service

CHICAGO - One minute, a red scribble of graffiti was on the cinderblock wall. The next minute, it was gone - erased by a jet-blast mixture of water and baking soda.
Nearby, a cryptic gang message had been scrawled in paint on a plastic trash can cover. Within moments, it disappeared, too - scrubbed by a citrus-based solution.

"It's no different than a dog marking a fire hydrant - it's somebody marking their turf," Matt Smith, spokesman for Chicago's Streets and Sanitation Department, said recently as city workers cleaned up defaced surfaces in a Northwest Side neighborhood. "It's vandalism. It's ego."

Chicago is trying to take back its walls through a $6.5 million annual program known as "Graffiti Blasters" that began in 1993. But at times, it might seem like an uphill battle for the 77 employees who use an arsenal of solvents and paints to erase or obscure the work of vandals.

Each year, mobile crews remove an average of 130,000 pieces of graffiti at public and private properties in affluent and distressed neighborhoods. The phoned-in reports come in constantly, and given the volume, it may take as long as a week to respond to a call, said supervisor Tom O'Connor. There is no charge to property owners.

The graffiti in Chicago ranges from intimidating gang messages to the random "taggings" of juvenile attention-seekers. There are even elaborate, quasi-artistic - though illegal - wall paintings and stenciled pieces of "guerilla marketing."

"Graffiti is not an expression," Smith said. "If you want to make an expression, use a canvas."

And then there are the pieces of "hate graffiti" that express a racist or vulgar message. Those markings get top priority for removal, Smith said.

Graffiti Blasters is the reactive side of Chicago's efforts. The city is ready to launch a revised front-end strategy, with the recent approval of an ordinance that holds parents or guardians financially liable if their minor child damages a property with graffiti. Under the new law, which takes effect in November, adults can be socked with a fine of between $250 and $750 and be obligated to pay restitution.

Mayor Richard Daley sought higher financial penalties but negotiated a cap with aldermen who said poor families would be hurt by heftier payments. Ald. James Balcer, a Vietnam veteran who was incensed by vandalism at a war memorial downtown, said the new ordinance is appropriate.

Chicago has tried to fight graffiti legislatively in the past, and officials concede the problem hasn't gone away. The City Council banned the sale of spray paint at local stores and more recently prohibited the sale of acid-based pastes that vandals have used to permanently scratch windows - a more recent trend in graffiti.

A sponsor of the latter measure, Ald. Manny Flores, said troublemakers can get around the law by ordering the product over the Internet. Normally, the pastes are used for arts and crafts. When used on windows, the damage cannot be reversed; Graffiti Blasters refers acid-etchings to the police department, Smith said.

"I feel terrible for these entrepreneurs, these mom-and-pop (store owners) trying to make a go of it," Flores said. "They go to work, and all of a sudden they see their front window damaged."

One graffiti expert-for-hire said cities that document and track the activity of vandals have had the most success in reducing it. Timothy Kephart, president and CEO of Graffiti Tracker Inc., said his Omaha, Neb.-based firm has contracts with 24 cities to analyze data and provide "intelligence" to police officials, who use the information to zero in on suspects.

"If you don't catch the kids, you can't hold the parent accountable," he said.

Kephart said the vandalism has "significantly increased" over the past five years in urban and suburban areas alike. It is thought that graffiti costs property owners billions of dollars annually across the United States.

"It's multiple factors," Kephart said. "You have got more of a pop culture that is exposing kids to this to make it seem kind of cool. There's probably more disorganization in the home."

Smith, the streets and sanitation agency spokesman, said Chicago's Graffiti Blasters program represents a zero-tolerance policy as prolific vandals keep trying to send their "message."

"We'll send a message: We won't tolerate it," he said.


http://www.graffititracker.net/



http://www.register-mail.com/stories/100507/LOC_BEH2I6MR.GID.shtml

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Edited by - FLASH ABC on 10/05/2007 1:08:52 PM
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1mic
Orange Dot

USA
523 Posts

Posted - 10/06/2007 :  06:51:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I heard that they let KET go but he has to pay a $12,000 fine

let em know nak...
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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2007 :  3:15:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Art slogan mistaken for graffiti

Cauty (left) was part of novelty band the Timelords and The KLF
A slogan created by an artist who famously burned £1m has been scrubbed off the wall of a Sussex art gallery by cleaners who mistook it for graffiti.
James Cauty used white emulsion paint to scrawl "Portslade Massif" across the window and wall of the Ink-d gallery in Brighton to advertise his exhibition.

The Rize and Fall of the Portslade Massif opened there on Thursday.

Brighton and Hove City Council said the removal of the writing by its graffiti team was a "genuine mistake".

Who holds the right to say what is and isn't a form of expression?

Dan Hipkin, Ink-d gallery

But gallery studio director Dan Hipkin questioned the action, and said the slogan had been on private property.

He said he believed the cleaners feared the slogan - which referred to the exhibition's theme of gang culture - would create gang warfare locally.

"Brighton and Hove City Council, like anywhere, have problems with graffiti gangs but this is private property and my problems with the cleaning crew doing this is more about freedom of expression.

"Who holds the right to say what is and isn't a form of expression?

'Closing down sale'

"Who decides what is considered aggressive and if it was so offensive, why weren't the police called?"

Mr Hipkin said he had questioned whether the cleaners would have removed the slogan if it had said "closing down sale".

But he admitted the cleaners might have thought the gallery was disused because the window had been papered over ahead of Cauty's exhibition opening night.

James Cauty was a member of the 1990s bands The KLF and The Orb, and along with his former bandmate Bill Drummond, burned £1m of the royalties earned by KLF

TOOOO FUNNY

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FLASH ABC
Administrator (NYC Fat Cap)

USA
7600 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2007 :  2:36:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLASH ABC's Homepage  Reply with Quote


Anti-graffiti system takes picture of tagger
MONTEBELLO POLICE USE CAMERAS, SENSORS ALONG BUSY STREETS, PARKS
By Tami Abdollah
Los Angeles Times
Article Launched: 12/03/2007 01:35:17 AM PST



MONTEBELLO - The man approached the wall and began to spray paint with wild abandon.

Immediately, an alert went off at the Montebello Police Department, and a female voice identified the location: "Tagging at 1st and Whittier, northeast Floor Shop." The screens on numerous surveillance monitors flashed red as cameras zoomed in.

Ultimately, there were no arrests. The tagger was part of a demonstration recently of Montebello's new $1 million anti-graffiti system. The system includes certain cameras equipped with the "tagger trap," designed to catch taggers red-handed along city streets and in parks.

The system, produced by Pasadena-based Axium Technologies, includes a sensor that company and police officials said reacts to the sound emitted from an aerosol can up to 80 feet away.

When triggered, the system notifies authorities quickly through an electronic link to police headquarters, they said.

Officials said they plan to install about 120 cameras around the city by the end of December. Of those, 25 will include the special sensors, while the others will provide standard surveillance, officials said.

"So when somebody's spraying a wall or specific target, this sensor activates the camera" before sending a signal to police, said detective Ismael Navarro of the Montebello Police Department's special investigations unit's graffiti task force. Then, "dispatch zooms in and sends units to the area. Even if we don't catch them


in the act, the activity is recorded, so we can always go and rewind."
Navarro said city officials hope the new system will help reduce the cost of painting over graffiti by 40 percent to 50 percent within three to four years.

"A million dollars is a lot of money, but we're spending close to $700,000 a year repairing graffiti, and we don't really have any proactive approach to combat it other than cleaning it up after they've done it," Navarro said.

So far 60 cameras, 14 with the tagger-trap technology, are up and running along the city's major thoroughfares.

Each camera equipped with the latest technology costs $20,000 to $30,000.

The city of Los Angeles has 65 surveillance cameras that snap 35-millimeter film photos when triggered by a motion detector and play a recorded announcement warning taggers to stop and leave. Those cameras cost about $3,000 each, said Paul Racs, director of the Office of Community Beautification for the city's Public Works Department.

"About once a month, they go out and pull out the film, put in new film, develop the pictures and see if there is any usable information," Racs said. "They kind of serve as a deterrent effect."

Racs said Los Angeles has budgeted about $7 million annually to clean up graffiti.

In Chicago and Washington, D.C., there are camera systems that can detect the sound of gunshots and alert authorities, said Mike Fergus, a manager for the video evidence project at the International Association of Chiefs of Police in Alexandria, Va.




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Edited by - FLASH ABC on 02/26/2008 2:38:24 PM
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JET1-
Grey Outline

297 Posts

Posted - 12/04/2007 :  08:31:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
money well spent, huh

f**k the homeless and the illiterate children. tax dollars should go towards $30,000 cameras. f**k it get 60 of them. we should take our tax dollars and pay cops to browse the internet and collect information on kids who like art.
very good ideas. disinform and disinfranchise, the mindless masses won't know the difference. we need this.
daley wants a tax hike. raise sales tax he says, it's bad enough your property taxes are through the roof and climbing. now he wants to charge you extra for toilet paper.
more parking tickets please, send me a few traffic violations in the mail.
push the people out mayor
america's on a downward spiral

what a joke

i need to move
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REJECT
Banana Skinny

USA
173 Posts

Posted - 12/09/2007 :  03:39:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was watchin the news about 2 months ago or somethin, and some suburb i live around was on the news... for to much tagging. My first reaction to this, was pissing myself, then i payed attension. They started talkin about a park in this suburb, thats getting hit up to much, and the locals now want a security camera on the park or some sh*t, and they interview some 5 yr old kid and force him to say that the tagging was distracting to him. First off, f**k the media, Second off, f**k that little 5 yr old kid. How the hades is tagging so distracting to your 5 yr old kid, who cant even f**ken read yet, that you gotta call the news and make a damn report on it. What the hades is this world coming to? OH YEAH! AND THEY HAD THE NERVE TO SHOW AN X-MEN TAG THAT WAS PROBABLY DONE A COUPLE YEARS AGO, IN THE CITY, AND ACT LIKE IT HAD SOMETHIN TO DO WITH THIS PARK BULLsh*t!?


-I just wanted to go on a little rant there, to take out my anger on the punk ass media for doing that.
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REJECT
Banana Skinny

USA
173 Posts

Posted - 12/09/2007 :  03:42:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was watchin the news about 2 months ago or somethin, and some suburb i live around was on the news... for to much tagging. My first reaction to this, was pissing myself, then i payed attension. They started talkin about a park in this suburb, thats getting hit up to much, and the locals now want a security camera on the park or some sh*t, and they interview some 5 yr old kid and force him to say that the tagging was distracting to him. First off, f**k the media, Second off, f**k that little 5 yr old kid. How the hades is tagging so distracting to your 5 yr old kid, who cant even f**ken read yet, that you gotta call the news and make a damn report on it. What the hades is this world coming to? OH YEAH! AND THEY HAD THE NERVE TO SHOW AN X-MEN TAG THAT WAS PROBABLY DONE A COUPLE YEARS AGO, IN THE CITY, AND ACT LIKE IT HAD SOMETHIN TO DO WITH THIS PARK BULLsh*t!?


-I just wanted to go on a little rant there, to take out my anger on the punk ass media for doing that.
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